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The Green Man mural, painted on the wall in Wilson Library, as glimpsed by looking through the stacks..

Wilson Library’s ‘Green Man’ turns 50

In December 1968, two U of M students brought a bucket of green paint into Wilson Library and started painting on one of the walls. When asked to explain their actions, the students presented a forged work order, and said they were “just doing what they were told.” No one stopped them from completing their unauthorized mural — and 50 years later, it's still here!
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Two books for Sherlock Holmes fans

Sherlock Holmes expert Tim Johnson recommends two books to give to Sherlock Holmes fans: About Sixty: Why Every Sherlock Holmes Story is the Best, and About Being a Sherlockian, both edited by Christopher Redmond. Johnson was a guest on Read This Book!, produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries and hosted by the U's Lisa Von Drasek.
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Thumbs up to ‘American Music’

Music Librarian Jessica Abbazio recommends "American Music" by Annie Leibovitz as a book to give as a gift on this installment of Read This Book from the University of Minnesota Libraries.
Betsy Friesen, Daniel McCarthy-Clifford, and Boris Oicherman

Exhibit highlights banned prison books

Daniel McCarthy Clifford — an artist in residence at Weisman Art Museum’s Target Studio for Creative Collaboration — is raising awareness about the seemingly arbitrary method employed by prisons to keep books out of the hands of inmates. He's doing so by way of an exhibit at the Weisman, called "The Section of Disapproved Books." The University Libraries was a key contributor to the exhibit, which is curated by Weisman’s Boris Oicherman.
Photo of three images from 21st Editions collection.

Libraries adds 21st Editions collection

Recently, the University Libraries acquired the entire 21st Editions collection — consisting of 63 volumes. The company has published beautiful and unique handmade books that combine photography with literature and poetry. The acquisition also includes the firm’s archives — process prints with notes from the artist or the publisher, sketches, correspondence, and production notes.
The 1927 Report of the Comptroller featured a detailed outline of the University’s General Accounting System, including a description of how tabulating or punch cards are used.

The Power of the Punch Card (and the Punch Card Operator)

Machines and people have been working together for decades, perhaps more than you had thought, to keep University information technology systems running. The people operating punch card and tabulating machines, the majority of whom were women, most likely did not see their role as one of managing information technology.
Microwave Turkey

Microwave a turkey the library way

You might have seen a prank going around about cooking a 25-pound turkey in a microwave. It seems like a bad idea but we’re a group of curious, food-motivated librarians and we thought… can it be done? Here's what we found.

Local news outlets feature Libraries’ World War I collections

The Libraries’ vast collection of World War I materials was featured recently in several local media outlets, as the world commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Armistice on November 11.
U of M Radio On Your Historic Dial with retro radio icon

Women on the Air: People Worth Hearing About

The program series People Worth Hearing About originated with The Minnesota School of the Air director, Betty Girling. The series first aired in 1969. In this episode, a feature on Maria Sanford is highlighted along with the behind-the-scenes decisions on how to produce the script.
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Map Library wins Governor’s award

Ryan Mattke, Head of the Borchert Map Library, accepted the Governor's Award on October 4 for the Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs Online website, which includes thousands of digital copies of historical aerial photographs, mostly from between the 1920s and the 1990s, covering all 87 counties in Minnesota.
Bridget McKenna in the Wangensteen Library, holding a book on historic infant feeding.

Breaking new ground

Bridget McKenna participated in the College of Liberal Arts Dean’s Freshman Research & Creative Scholars Program. Through this program, McKenna learned the present-day value of libraries, while she was matched with the curators of the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine.
Ryan Mattke, Map & Geospatial Information Librarian, points out details on an 1871 map of Minnesota to Benjamin Wiggins, Program Director of the Digital Arts, Sciences, & Humanities (DASH) program.

Wilson Studio — perfect for group research projects

A Research Sprints session brings teams of researchers and librarians together to work intensely and collaboratively over a period of several days. The program has found a perfect home in the Wilson Research Collaboration Studio, which opened its doors for the first time last year.
Destroyed woods south of Automba, Minnesota, 1918. Photographer: T.J. Horton.

The fires of October 12, 1918

On the afternoon of October 12, 1918 in northeastern Minnesota, several forest fires killed over 450 people and decimated 2,000 square miles of forests, homesteads, and townships. The University of Minnesota Forest Experiment Station, known today as the Cloquet Forestry Center, survived the fire. The Center’s archival collection contains photographs that document the aftermath of the fires in the region.
Valerie Caesar

Elmer L. Andersen Library 2.0

The process of discovery occurs constantly in the Wallin Center, a new space within the Elmer L. Andersen Library. The center builds upon the Andersen Library’s legacy to be a window onto the world through its collections — available and accessible to all.
Forrest O. Wiggins, 1947. Hired by the University of Minnesota as an instructor in Philosophy, Prof. Wiggins was the first African American to teach at the University of Minnesota. Dismissed from the University in 1951, Wiggins believed the reasoning was directly related to his socialist ideology.

Portraits of the Past

A preview of Calling to Question: 150 of Liberal Education at the University of Minnesota (opening March 4, 2019) is currently on display in the Katherine E. Nash Gallery. This preview is composed of two display cases within On Purpose: Portrait of the Liberal Arts. The preview compliments the style of the portrait exhibit by showcasing retrospective portraits of the College of Liberal Arts alongside the personal accounts of the people involved in these historical snapshots.