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Your Winter Weather Survival Guide

If you have been under the weather this season, we are here to share a few trusted health resources to help you recover and stay healthy, along with options to explore, learn, and have fun at the Libraries.
Stress Busters 2017

Libraries help you #GetThoseGrades with Stress Busters and 24/7 study

Feeling underwater? Decompress with the Stress Busters events at libraries across campus and #GetThoseGrades with extended hours - including 24/7 library access.
Makerspace welcome sign at the Bio-Medical Library.

New Libraries makerspaces bring innovation to the stacks

Learn. Make. Innovate. These are fitting words to accompany the welcome sign for the new Makerspace at the Bio-Medical Library, joining the Breakerspace in Walter Library as the two library makerspace locations on campus. Makerspaces offer tools and community for individuals who what to tinker as they explore solutions to problems - big and small.
Pharmacy boxes from the Wangensteen artifact collection.

A Shakespearean recipe for Witch’s Brew

As Halloween nears, staff at the Wangensteen Historical Library are finding inspiration from a Witch's Brew recipe written in Shakespeare's Macbeth, which included "eye of newt" as an ingredient. While gathering other ingredients to fill our cauldron, we quickly found that the eye of newt was not to be taken literally but in fact a common name for mustard seed. This was true for some of the other ingredients as well.
Final #UnderwaterPumpkin carved by Emily.video

‘Underwater’ pumpkin carving at the Wangensteen Historical Library

We are welcoming back Emily Beck and her pumpkin carving talents as she brings us underwater adventures in jack o'lantern form, inspired by the Wangensteen Historical Library's current exhibit. Watch a short video of Emily from last year and check out the stencils to create - and share - your own underwater-inspired carving.
Caitlin Bakker, Del Reed, Jenny McBurney, Katherine Chew

Demonstrating the public impact of University of Minnesota research

A new service at the University Libraries widens the scope of impact metrics available to researchers and helps them see a more complete view of the impact of their work. “It’s a great feedback loop to know whether your research is reaching its intended audience,” says Lisa Harnack, an epidemiology professor in the U of M's School of Public Health.
Sarah Jane Brown, Clinical Information Librarian

Sarah Jane Brown joins the Bio-Medical Library as a Clinical Information Librarian

Sarah Jane Brown, MSc, began her work as a Clinical Information Librarian at the Bio-Medical Library this August. As a Clinical Information Librarian, Brown will support the patient care, clinical research, and educational needs of the Medical School.

Pharmacopoeia: Medicinal Plants Growing In My Backyard

The Bio-Medical Library is excited to announce the latest installment in its rotating Art@Bio-Med exhibit series: Pharmacopoeia: Medicinal Plants Growing In My Backyard by artist Linda Gammell. This exhibition highlights photographic and text selections from Gammell's artist's book project and draws from family narrative, personal garden history, and scientific knowledge of medicine and plants.
Handmade jellyfish are displayed as the Underwater exhibit comes together.

Underwater exhibit – an EXCLUSIVE behind-the-scenes look

This September, the Wangensteen Historical Library's new Underwater Exhibit will open to the public - exploring the intersection of humans, health, and science in watery spaces. Communications Intern A’Davian Smith sits down with curators Emily Beck and Lois Hendrickson to get a behind-the-scenes look as they walk through the process of creating this exhibit.
Connie Bongiorno

What Drives Connie Bongiorno

Connie Bongiorno personifies industriousness. Bongiorno joined the University of Minnesota Libraries’ Bio-Medical Library just over a year ago as a Clinical Information Librarian and already possesses an impressive list of successes that have positively impacted the University.
Image credit: Pills by David Kessler.

Resources for understanding the opioid crisis

On August 10, President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national emergency. Many underlying factors have led to the rapid increase in opioid-related deaths and to the related federal initiatives to combat the crisis. This post provides information on recent news, current research, and reliable information to help you understand the opioid crisis.
Teaching with Primary Resources

Teaching with Primary Resources

Wondering how to incorporate primary sources into your teaching? Looking for inspiring ideas for interactive activities with impact? Join the Wangensteen Historical Library’s curators to learn about developing activities that both introduce students to the research skills necessary to interrogate historical texts and artifacts and teach important course content.
Alan Johns, Paula Termuhlen, and Connie Bongiorno.

Journal to serve as forum for research at regional medical campuses

The University of Minnesota Libraries — in partnership with the U's Duluth Medical School — developed the Journal of Regional Medical Campuses, which will launch this fall. The journal will serve as a forum for ideas and research around regional medical campuses across North America, and will raise the visibility of issues unique to regional medical campuses.

Underwater

Rare books in the exhibit feature striking images of aquatic natural history, various technologies, and experiences of water and health. The exhibit is open September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018 during regular library hours at the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, 568 Diehl Hall.
video

Unwrapping a new medical receipt book at the Wangensteen Historical Library

Receiving a new acquisition is like opening a much-anticipated present. Earlier this year, the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine purchased a French manuscript recipe book written in the 1770s. Watch as Curators Lois Hendrickson and Emily Beck - along with their colleague, French historian Margaret Carlyle - open the book for the first time and rediscover informative content and hidden treasures.