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From the Archivist

Occasional posts related to University history

Latest Blog Posts

A Clinic That’s For the Birds

On this installment of "U of M Radio on your Historic Dial," we’ll travel to the St. Paul campus to "A Clinic That’s for the Birds" – which also happens to be the title of the December 8, 1977 episode of Look What We Found.  If you haven’t yet deciphered the title of the broadcast, we are going on an audio tour of the Raptor Center.  The Raptor Center is a research and rehabilitation center for birds of prey which today cares for approximately 800 ill and injured raptors each year.
U of M Radio On Your Historic Dial with retro radio icon

Another Way to Go From Minneapolis to St. Paul

By Rebecca Toov You are listening to U of M Radio on your Historic Dial! From 1938-1979, the Minnesota School of the Air brought educational programs into the classrooms of Minnesota and beyond over radio airwaves...

50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act

Fifty years ago, on November 7, 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act which created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the act, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is encouraging organizations to share archival materials related to the history and preservation of public broadcasting. University of Minnesota Archives is happy to join them.
Ski-U-Mah, 1921-1949, a magazine “of the University in the fullest sense of the word” with emphasis on humor, fashion, and campus social news

Student publications over the years

Students at the University have been writing — and publishing — opinions and short stories and literary criticism and jokes and poems and news stories since 1877. That's when the first student newspaper Ariel began publication. Its successor, the Minnesota Daily, has been in continuous publication since May 1, 1900.
U of M Radio On Your Historic Dial with retro radio icon

In A Vietnamese Kitchen

In this week’s episode of Look What We Found, titled “In A Vietnamese Kitchen,” the producers teach an important lesson about cultural understanding by starting a conversation about cuisine. While interviewing the owner of Bamboo Village, Patty asked, “What made you decide to open a restaurant?” She replied, “I like a place where we can exchange the culture between the Vietnamese and the American and have something more to show, you know? We have a chance to interact with the American, to meet them on a day-to-day basis.” Episode 2, Season 2 of "U of M Radio On Your Historic Dial."

Latest News from the Libraries

Julius Lester: Activist, Folklorist, Children’s Book Writer,, Photographer, Scholar, Mensch

    Obituaries are Odd Things When I had heard that Julius Lester had died, for the next day I searched obsessively for remembrances and obituaries. FaceBook...

He Will Be Missed: Julius Lester

From Julius Lester's Facebook page in the last half hour. "Julius has passed peacefully, surrounded by family. The family is requesting privacy at this time...

Heads Up: Children of Blood and Bone

  Big Book alert. Children of Blood And Bone by Tomi Adyemi (March 2018, Henry Holt) I like big books and I cannot lie. This one is a 600...