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Primary Sourcery Blog


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IHRCA Grant-in-Aid Winners Announced

By Ellen Engseth Curator, Immigration History Research Center Archives and Head, Migration and Social Services Collections Each year, the Immigration History Research Center Archives (IHRCA) provides Grant-in-Aid Awards to scholars to support visits to our collections for conducting research. Please join us in congratulating this year’s Grant-in-Aid Award winners at the Immigration History Research Center Archives! Jessica Barbata […]

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Primary sources and the digital generation: Ernst Haeckel

Emmie Miller, graduate student in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine at the University of Minnesota, recently teamed up with Lois Hendrickson, Curator of the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, to bring primary resources to the digital generation. As she notes in a recent post to her departmental blog, “One difficult thing about […]

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Lisa Von Drasek

Von Drasek named to 2017 Caldecott Committee

Lisa Von Drasek, Curator of the University of Minnesota’s Children’s Literature Research Collections (CLRC), has been named to the 2017 Caldecott Committee. The committee will decide the winner of the 2017 Caldecott Medal, named in honor of 19th-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott.

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Archives and Special Collections Year in Review

Archives and Special Collections has compiled our numbers for July of 2014 through June of 2015: 15,162 people were served in 2014/15 through 8,449 reference inquiries and 6,713 non-reference inquiries. Staff members spent 2,806.58 hours assisting these users.

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Hendrickson new Curator of the Wangensteen Library

Lois Hendrickson began her work as Curator of the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine on August 10. She is an alumna of the University of Minnesota, where she earned her Bachelor’s in History, and the University of Denver where she received her MLS.

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Primary sources and the digital generation:
Alexander Von Humboldt

Alexander Von Humboldt, a German world traveler in the 19th century, was one of the most influential scientists and naturalists of his time. Humboldt’s groundbreaking work on botanical geography laid the foundation for the field of biogeography.

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The Health Sciences Libraries are Going to the Fair

Staff at the Health Sciences Libraries will be working hard while having fun at the Minnesota State Fair, August 22 – September 7. Join us as we research health literacy, explore odd and sometimes frightening medical artifacts of the past, share good health information, and test medical knowledge with our health fact or fiction quiz. What: […]

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Excerpt from Zoonomia by Erasumus Darwin. The word BANKS in capital letters surrounded by a yellow circle.

Primary sources and the digital generation: Erasmus Darwin

The Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine houses rare books dating from 1430 to 1930, along with a collection of written manuscripts and medical artifacts. Historical libraries that offer glimpses into the past are treasures for historians, artists, and researchers, among others. They stand in stark contrast to our daily lives, where information is pushed to us through digital technologies at every point in our day, only to be disposed of in the moment.

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Image from Nouveau recueil d’ostéologie et de myologie (1779) by the painter and engraver Jacques Gamelin (1738-1803).

Wangensteen Historical Library celebrates Bastille Day

At the University of Minnesota’s Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, we decided to commemorate Bastille Day by sharing a captivating image from one of our rare 18th century French anatomical texts, Nouveau recueil d’ostéologie et de myologie (1779) by the painter and engraver Jacques Gamelin (1738-1803).

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Floating Marsh-marigold and Purple Loosestrife

History of medicine inspires art

From rare books to drawings and documents, the Wangensteen collection of nearly 70,000 volumes from the 15th to 20th centuries fuels the imaginations of artists who share a collective interest in biology and a passion for digging through old material to find just the right image or phrase to influence their creative work.

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